Hi, This is Aki!

I draw things and play video games.

Welcome to my personal blog.

‎(╯°□°)╯*:・゚✧

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kawacy:

1month, 2-3hours work each day

shatterstag:

theomeganerd:

This is what The Last of Us would look like on PSone

by ascii42, plainr_ and KyleFedora

PERFECT

anotherpassingmoment:

Okay, so I am sick of seeing so much hate towards Yogscast Members. So here’s what I plan to do; Whoever reblogs this by the 30th of July will have their URL put in a card and it will be sent to The Yogscast to show our appreciation. 

Please please reblog and show you care. It’s not fair that people are receiving hate from said ‘fans’. Let’s just show a little love yeah? 

elliejelliescribbles:

Iron Giant for Sketch Dailies

freystupid:

from  Library of World Literature for Children

N.I. Maltsev, Russian illustrator

ohstarstuff:

Galactic Center of Our Milky Way

The Hubble Space Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory — collaborated to produce an unprecedented image of the central region of our Milky Way galaxy.

Observations using infrared light and X-ray light see through the obscuring dust and reveal the intense activity near the galactic core. The center of the galaxy is located within the bright white region in the upper portion of the image. The entire image covers about one-half a degree, about the same angular width as the full moon.

Each telescope’s contribution is presented in a different color:

  • Yellow represents the near-infrared observations of Hubble. They outline the energetic regions where stars are being born as well as reveal hundreds of thousands of stars.
  • Red represents the infrared observations of Spitzer. The radiation and winds from stars create glowing dust clouds that exhibit complex structures from compact, spherical globules to long, stringy filaments.
  • Blue and violet represents the X-ray observations of Chandra. X-rays are emitted by gas heated to millions of degrees by stellar explosions and by outflows from the supermassive black hole in the galaxy’s center. The bright blue blob toward the bottom of the full field image is emission from a double star system containing either a neutron star or a black hole.

loftyanchor:

Daily 54 - Link